A man who fears suffering is already suffering from what he fears.

Michel de Montaigne (1533 - 1592) - essayist, philosopher, writer.

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The only interesting answers are those that destroy the questions.

Susan Sontag (1933 - 2004) - writer, philosopher, critic.

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I secretly think reality exists so we can speculate about it.

Slavoj Zizek, philosopher, writer.

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We see the world in terms of our theories.

Thomas Kuhn (1922 - 1996) - philosopher of science, physicist.

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1965 anti-porn propaganda opens with the exact same arguments anti-porn feminists, anti-porn nuero”scientists” and more make today, thinking their argument of distribution is novel.  The other arguments are all the same, too - only the homosexual aspect has been largely (though not totally) dropped.

Almost no arguments against porn are thoughtful, complete, or worthwhile.

Myth is neither a lie nor a confession: it is an inflexion.

Roland Barthes (1915 - 1980), philosopher, author, and literary critic.

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He who does not understand the number does not understand death.

JM Coetzee, novelist.

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The exhausted poststructuralism pervading American universities is abject philistinism masquerading as advanced thought. Everywhere, young scholars labor in bondage to a corrupt and incestuous academic establishment. But these “mind-forg’d manacles” (in William Blake’s phrase) can be broken in an instant. All it takes is the will to be free.

Camille Paglia, from her excellent new essay on how academia distorts and dilutes sex and kink.  In it, she also says, rightly, ”…natural voices (about sex and kink) have been squelched by the dreary protocols of gender studies.”

There is no pure myth except the idea of a science that is pure of all myth.

Michel Serres, philosopher

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“I would venture to say we cannot prove anything by one experiment or even several experiments together, that nothing is more dangerous than the desire to prove some thesis directly through experiments…. Every piece of empirical evidence we find, every experiment in which this evidence is repeated, really represents just one part of what we know…. Every piece of empirical evidence, every experiment, must be viewed as isolated, yet the human faculty of thought forcibly strives to unite all external objects known to it….


We often find that the more limited the data, the more artful a gifted thinker will become. As though to assert his sovereignty he chooses a few agreeable favorites from the limited number of facts and skillfully marshals the rest so they never contradict him directly. Finally he is able to confuse, entangle, or push aside the opposing facts and reduce the whole to something more like the court of a despot than a freely constituted republic.”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe - writer and scientist, from ““The Experiment as Mediator Between Object and Subject”

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No domain can have a monopoly on reason, except via abuse… I am a rationalist in most of my life - like everyone! But I am not a rationalist if reason is defined as an ingredient only found in science. This restrictive definition is not reasonable.

Michel Serres, philosopher

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The vision is always a fact. It is the reality that is often a fraud.

G.K. Chesteron, from Orthodoxy

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If the organism is a whole and each section of it functions normally within that whole, then in the analytic experiment, which isolates the sections as it studies them, the properties and functions of any part must be modified by their isolation from the whole of the organism.

Thus, they cannot reveal the function of these parts in normal life.

There are innumerable facts which demonstrate how the functioning of a field is changed by its isolation. If we want to use the results of such experiments for understanding the activity of the organism in normal life (that is, as a whole), we must know in what way the condition of isolation modifies the functioning, and we must take these modifications into account.

We have every reason to occupy ourselves very carefully with this condition of isolation.”

Kurt Goldstein (1878 - 1965) from The Organism.

Goldstein was a neurologist and philosopher.

Above, Goldstein is trying to show that dissecting something - whether an animal or an idea, and isolating one aspect of it (examining the evolution of an animal by consider how a certain part of its body evolved, for example.  or pulling the DNA out of a mouse to learn about mouse genetics) disrupts the very thing we seek to study and learn about - the whole organism or the whole phenomenon.

To pull a petal off a flower creates a dead petal.  We can study it, but we must be cognizant that it is not a part of the dynamic whole of the flower anymore.  So we must at the same time observe how the isolation changes the subject we’re studying at the same time as studying the subject itself.

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If people who define themselves as atheists (want) to set up churches, well, go for it guys, because that’s what you are, you’re a religion anyway, so you might as well admit it!
— Graham Hancock

Eddie Huang exposes TED as a cult-like organization that asks for fake standing ovations, doesn’t pay its speakers, demands participants stay on for twelve hour days and not leave the premises, and more.